Not accepted by Harvard? You’re in good company.

July 9, 2013 at 6:39 pm Leave a comment

Here’s an excellent case study on what lengths parents have to go to in order to find appropriate educational opportunities for their profoundly gifted children by Susan Freinkel, titled “IQ like Einstein:  What is it really like to parent a profoundly gifted child?

If your own student isn’t getting into Harvard, take heart.  The profoundly gifted kids from Davidson Academy often don’t go there either.

“A diploma from Davidson doesn’t translate into automatic admission to Harvard or Yale, says Melissa Lance, communications manager for Davidson Institute. Indeed, with a handful of exceptions, the list of schools that graduates are attending is surprisingly middle-tier. Lance offers several explanations: students may not have that well-rounded resume admissions officers are seeking; they may not have high GPAs; or they may not be seduced by the prestige of a top-tier school, preferring to find a place that simply feels to them like a good fit. Whatever the reason, “not a lot of our students apply to the Ivies,” she says.”

If you’ve agonized about accelerating your student’s education, take heart from this research:

“Studies suggest that most highly gifted kids fit in just fine with older students and thrive when allowed to learn at an accelerated place. For instance, Australian researcher Miraca Gross followed a group of 60 students with very high IQs for two decades. She found that those who were allowed to skip ahead at least three grade levels tended to do well academically and socially; most got PhDs, settled into professional careers, formed relationships, and developed good friends. The 33 who were not allowed to accelerate in school had less charmed lives. Most ended up at less rigorous colleges and several never graduated high school or college. They also had more trouble forming social relationships. Having spent so many years feeling alienated, they had no practice connecting with people, Gross speculated.”

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Entry filed under: Acceleration, admissions, Early college, social-emotional needs.

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Insights and advice from a parent of two gifted teenagers

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