Why I Now Like Research Universities

March 30, 2013 at 5:43 pm Leave a comment

I wrote this prophetic sentence in 2009:

“The book also helped me rethink my bias towards sending my son to an liberal arts college rather than a research university.  I now think it would be good for him to get to know grad students informally and see what is expected of them, before he makes up his mind about grad school.”

Up until then, I had a bias towards liberal arts colleges, like the ones my husband and I attended, for their small size.  But both of my kids ended up at research universities.  (In my daughter’s case, she’s at the smallest research university in the country.)  But both of them had the opportunity to take graduate level courses while they were still undergrads.  They gained the confidence that they could excel even in higher level classes.  Plus, they could state on their graduate school applications that they had already excelled in graduate level courses, which was a great predictor of their probability of success.

Another advantage is that research university professors win grants, which often cover stipends for their students to do (paid!) research or internships.  That research can then result in the student getting published, which is another key to resume building.

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Entry filed under: Internships, Ph.D..

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Insights and advice from a parent of two gifted teenagers

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