Little fish / big pond

November 10, 2007 at 9:18 pm Leave a comment

At the National Association for Gifted Children conference, one of the undercurrents is the “Little Fish/Big Pond” issue.  If you take a brilliant child from a situation where he is the best and move him to an environment with his intellectual peers, where he is no longer the best, is that detrimental?   One pundit believes so, because the kids’ self-esteem takes a hit.

In the presentation, “An Investigation of Two Summer Residential Programs for Academically Talented Students”, researchers used data from Duke Talent Identification Program (TIP) and Northwestern University’s Center for Talent Development (CTD) summer programs for gifted kids to address that claim.  They found:

  • “During summer programs, students’ academic self-concept decreased.
  • “During summer programs, students’ athletic, appearance, social and parent relations self-concepts increased.
  • “Students rated summer programs higher than school on virtually all experiences.
  • “There were significant differences in ratings of summer programs by level of qualification (higher SAT level benefits mores), grade (younger students benefit academically while older students benefit socially), and gender (females give higher ratings).”
Advertisements

Entry filed under: social-emotional needs, summer programs.

SAT Writing Test Success factors among early college entrants

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Insights and advice from a parent of two gifted teenagers

Feeds

Archives

November 2007
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Jan »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

%d bloggers like this: